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Our Vision

At Australian Farm Albums we believe in the value of photographs as memories and provide farming families with quality professional photographs that document their farms in bespoke, hard cover coffee-table style photo books which tell their individual farming stories.

About

About

Australian Farm Albums was born from the marriage of a farmer and a photographer.
Caro (of Anita Jean Photography) and Roger Telfer of (Warragal Park) are the team behind the company that brings you Australian Farm Albums.
Read more about Caro and Roger.

Contact

Want to chat?-image

Want to chat?

Call Caro on 0427363068, email info@ausfarmalbums.com.au
or if you prefer to Skype, user name is carotelfer...

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Your Farm Album is a beautifully bound hard-cover book embossed with silver, featuring your farm or family name. The pages are thick and durable and have a smooth satin finish. The album comes with a glossy dust jacket

Photography

A photographer from Australian Farm Albums will visit your farm or property to capture the essence of your family and the place that they call home. The photographs will include both wide angle shots showing the landscapes you love, as well as close-up shots of details that can add so much to your farming story.
Your farm album will include photos of the buildings, infrastructure, livestock, pets, machinery, places and people that make your farm special.

Funds for Training

We bought a drone two years ago, excited that it would open up opportunities for aerial photography. When I first flew the DJI Phantom 2 Vision, billed as “The Flying Camera”, I was blown away! It was easy to fly and using an iPhone as a remote screen I could get amazing photos from the air. What a boon this would be to our farm photography business! Aerial photographs of your farm would add an extra dimension to the photos in your Australian Farm Album.

But when I started to look further into the business opportunities, I learnt that it was prohibited to fly an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) for professional purposes (anything other than for recreation) without a licence. So I looked at training courses and found that not only do I have to be accredited as a remote pilot, but I have to fly under the auspices of a business accredited with a Remote Operator’s Certificate. So for me personally and for Australian Farm Albums as a business to become fully accredited, we were looking at $5,500 in training, plus the application fees (about $600) to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) and ongoing annual fees to remain accredited. And that looked like the end of my brief career as a remote pilot…

The Industry Skills Fund (ISF) made the difference when I learned that the fund can pay up to 75% of training fees, which will help a business to develop new business opportunities. The education must be provided by a registered training organisation and the training can be for business owners or employees. After submitting an initial enquiry via the website, I was contacted by the ISF and one of their agents came out and sat down with us to go through our business to get an idea of where the business was at, and the opportunities that new skills would provide. They then made a report outlining the training available, and over the last few months I have spent several days training in Perth, as well as completing online course modules, to become a certified remote pilot. The ISF will follow up afterwards because they need to see that the funding they are providing is improving the bottom line for businesses.

Now we have bought the latest model Phantom 4 UAV and I’m ready to photograph farms from the sky, without having to leave the ground!

If you think your business could develop new business opportunities with access to training for business owners or employees, have a look at the Industry Skills Fund at https://www.business.gov.au/assistance/internal-assistance/industry-skills-fund and apply online.

Caro

aerial photo showing Australian farm land with distant horizon and fog

Farmland vista on a foggy morning

Aerial photo of a farm in Western Australia

Morning farm scene

Aerial photograph showing sheep in yards and trees on an Australian farm

Working sheep in yards

 

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Spring Colour

Farm photo showing aerial view over farmland near Darkan in WA

Aerial photo of view over farmland near Darkan in Western Australia

The golden colour of the landscape around Darkan and many farming areas in spring is the yellow flower of canola crops. Canola is grown for its high oil content. In Australia it is used for cooking oil, spreads and shortening, prepared foods, cosmetics, lubricants, fuels and other industrial applications. The byproduct meal is used as a feed supplement for dairy, poultry and other livestock. Apart from the bright colour it lends to the landscape the crop also spreads a distinct and unpleasant smell. And for those who suffer from hay-fever it can cause severe allergy symptoms.

aerial photo of canola crop growing near Darkan, WA.

The layout of this canola paddock looks a bit like the trunk of a tree (driveway) with branches reaching off it (contour banks).

 

But for farmers the golden colour of canola in flower is the colour of money!

 

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Business Move for Australian Farm Albums

Last week was a big week for the Australian Farm Albums business and for Caro, as she attended the Curtin Ignition program at the Centre for Entrepreneurship at Curtin Business School, at Curtin University in Perth. This was with thanks to a scholarship from the WA Department of Local Government and Communities, Women’s Interests.
The week was an intense training program full of speakers, presentations, discussions, and workshops where participants had access to mentors from the business and academic world, as well as graduating students from the MBA class at Curtin, to guide them in their business development journey.

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From the Curtin Ignition website:

Do you have an idea or innovation that could become a high growth business?

Ignition is an annual event held in Perth. Run by the Curtin Centre for Entrepreneurship, it is based on the successful Ignite program managed and delivered by the University of Cambridge Judge Business School’s Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning (CfEL).

Ignition is a five and a half day intensive program which prepares you for taking your idea to the business world. Ignition starts Sunday 31st August and culminates on Friday 5th September with a celebration dinner.

Ignition is comprised of a blend of practical teaching sessions, expert clinics, mentor sessions and experienced advice and support from leading entrepreneurs and innovators.

It will give you the tools, contacts and confidence to transform your idea into a successful business project.

The outcome of the week is that we now have a much clearer direction for the business, and in an exciting move we will be taking on new photographers to service more areas in the near future. So if your farm is in an area we haven’t been before, or if you are a rural photographer looking to expand your horizons, we might be working with you soon!!

 

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Real Aussie Farms on Facebook

We have been enjoying following the new Aussie Farms page on Facebook over the last week or so. The page celebrates all that Australian farmers are and do in a very positive way. But it doesn’t leave out the tough realities of farming. I liked the post about assisted calving (maybe because this year has been the first year in a very long time that we have not had cows calving on our farm, so have not had to deal with any troublesome births ourselves.)
The page aims to show all aspects of a broad range of farming enterprises in Australia.
The Real Aussie Farms page on Facebook is a great way for farmers to share their farming stories.
And an Australian Farm Album is a great way for you to showcase your farming story!

 

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Roger Telfer: Australian Farm Albums

I’ve been farming for 35 years. After school I came home to the farm for a year to decide what I wanted to do. My dad had about 1,200 acres cleared back then and I helped him tidy up some of the new land. We cleared another 600 acres and bought merino sheep. Until then Dad was running beef cattle and only had a few sheep. We have developed our merino flock to produce high quality fine wool.

I never found anything that I wanted to do more than farming, so I stayed on. I did some courses through TAFE – welding and agricultural mechanics – and I travelled, including an overseas agricultural exchange in Minnesota.

Eventually my parents retired to the coast and I married a farm girl from further out. We have made a lovely home on the farm for our kids, and our eldest son is now home on the farm too. In recent years we have been re-fencing paddocks and doing some land conservation work in salt affected areas. I’m really proud of what I have achieved on our family farm.

Photo of Roger on a motorbike on the farm, with the farm dog.

Roger is a farmer and partner at Australian Farm Albums

Now that our children are growing up, and our son is home on the farm, I have cut back on my farming work which has allowed me to take a more active part in my wife’s photography business, and to support Australian Farm Albums. I am also studying at the South West Institute of Technology, doing a course in commercial cooking.

 

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Caro Telfer: Australian Farm Albums

I grew up with my three sisters on a farm in the Great Southern and after I dropped out of university I went home to the family farm and farmed with my father for six years. I learnt a lot about machinery and enjoyed driving the tractor and the harvester. I remember we had one very dry year when I spent a lot of time in the old International truck carting water for livestock. I had my own sheep dog, and we spent hours droving sheep and working in the sheep yards. At shearing time I would roustabout until I got my owner-classer certificate and then I could class the wool.

Eventually the farm was sold and I moved to a tourist town where I worked at an art gallery for a short time before I met my husband and moved to his farm. It was strange becoming a farmer’s wife instead of a farmer. I still help out on the farm but my main focus for the last sixteen years has been my children, and now my photography business.

As Anita Jean Photography I had been photographing farming families for several years as part of my family portrait business when I realised that I wanted to document more than just the people on the farm. When my friend’s family made the tough decision to sell their farm I went and photographed the farm to make a farm album for the family before they left. Then I decided our own family should have one. And I wished that I had something similar to show my kids so they could see what I did on the farm with their grandfather before I was married. We have a bit of old video footage somewhere, but not an album of photos that tells the whole story.

And hey, why shouldn’t every family family have an album with photos that tell their farming story?

Photo of Caro Telfer, woman wearing glasses, a black dress, and a large heart necklace

Caro Telfer, photographer and partner at Australian Farm Albums

AIPP Logo (small)

Caro is an accredited professional photographer

 

 

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Feeding Sheep : Warragal Park

Despite the fact that the farm has turned green after the rains, which brought on the germination of pastures, there is still not enough bulk in that paddocks for the pregnant ewes to keep up their feed requirements prior to lambing. So the sheep are being trail feed with a mix of oats and lupins. This is an aerial shot from the DJI Phantom 2 Vision taken this morning at Warragal Park.

 

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Seeding at Warragal Park

After the opening rains seeding has started on Warragal Park. We started seeding canola on a fine and warm day in May.

Pictured is a Ford Versatile 9680 (350hp) which is towing a flexicoil 800 bar with AgMaster knife points on 7.2 inch spacing, 32 feet wide, with a felxicoil 1720 tank (170 bushels).

140511-4617_proof 140511-4626_proof 140511-4638_proof 140511-4643_proof 140511-4651_proof 140511-4652_proof 140511-4655_proof 140511-4673_proof

 

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Australian Farm Albums: Vision

120814-2545

At Australian Farm Albums we believe in the value of photographs as memories so we provide farming families with quality professional photographs that document their farms in bespoke, hard cover coffee-table style photo books which tell their individual farming stories.

 

We know that farming is a way of life and also a business. Many family farms have been handed down over several generations, and each generation has continued the legacy of preceding generations. We want farmers to showcase their life’s work in albums which portray their love of the land along with the struggles and successes they have during the course of their farming careers.

 

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Recent Tweets

  • How's the season looking? We would love to come and photograph your place (and your dog) when everything is green! https://t.co/dos435jx70 07:37 AM Jun 28
     

Roger Telfer: Australian Farm Albums

I’ve been farming for 35 years. After school I came home to the farm for a year to decide what I wanted to do. My dad had about 1,200 acres cleared back then and I helped him tidy up some of the new land. We cleared another 600 acres and bought merino sheep. Until then Dad was running beef cattle and only had a few sheep. We have developed our merino flock to produce high quality fine wool.

I never found anything that I wanted to do more than farming, so I stayed on. I did some courses through TAFE – welding and agricultural mechanics – and I travelled, including an overseas agricultural exchange in Minnesota.

Eventually my parents retired to the coast and I married a farm girl from further out. We have made a lovely home on the farm for our kids, and our eldest son is now home on the farm too. In recent years we have been re-fencing paddocks and doing some land conservation work in salt affected areas. I’m really proud of what I have achieved on our family farm.

Photo of Roger on a motorbike on the farm, with the farm dog.

Roger is a farmer and partner at Australian Farm Albums

Now that our children are growing up, and our son is home on the farm, I have cut back on my farming work which has allowed me to take a more active part in my wife’s photography business, and to support Australian Farm Albums. I am also studying at the South West Institute of Technology, doing a course in commercial cooking.

 

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Caro Telfer: Australian Farm Albums

I grew up with my three sisters on a farm in the Great Southern and after I dropped out of university I went home to the family farm and farmed with my father for six years. I learnt a lot about machinery and enjoyed driving the tractor and the harvester. I remember we had one very dry year when I spent a lot of time in the old International truck carting water for livestock. I had my own sheep dog, and we spent hours droving sheep and working in the sheep yards. At shearing time I would roustabout until I got my owner-classer certificate and then I could class the wool.

Eventually the farm was sold and I moved to a tourist town where I worked at an art gallery for a short time before I met my husband and moved to his farm. It was strange becoming a farmer’s wife instead of a farmer. I still help out on the farm but my main focus for the last sixteen years has been my children, and now my photography business.

As Anita Jean Photography I had been photographing farming families for several years as part of my family portrait business when I realised that I wanted to document more than just the people on the farm. When my friend’s family made the tough decision to sell their farm I went and photographed the farm to make a farm album for the family before they left. Then I decided our own family should have one. And I wished that I had something similar to show my kids so they could see what I did on the farm with their grandfather before I was married. We have a bit of old video footage somewhere, but not an album of photos that tells the whole story.

And hey, why shouldn’t every family family have an album with photos that tell their farming story?

Photo of Caro Telfer, woman wearing glasses, a black dress, and a large heart necklace

Caro Telfer, photographer and partner at Australian Farm Albums

AIPP Logo (small)

Caro is an accredited professional photographer

 

 

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All content on this website is copyright, and should not be used without the express consent of the copyright owner. Photographs, whether watermarked or not, must not be copied or printed, or used in any way, whether online or printed. Please do not download, copy, or take screen shots of photographs for your own personal or business use. For general information about copyright in Australia please see the Australian Copyright Council's general guidelines here, or visit www.copyright.org.au

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